Triiodothyronine, Total (TT3)

 

METHODOLOGY

Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA)

 

PERFORMED  

 

Tuesday & Friday

REPORTED  

2 days

COLLECT  

 

One 6mL RT (Min: 4mL RT)

TRANSPORT  

 

1 mL refrigerated serum (Min: 0.5 mL)


STABILITY  


Stored at 2 - 8°C until used; Stable if frozen at - 20°C 

UNACCEPTABLE SPECIMENS  

Do not use heat-inactivated samples.


REFERENCE RANGE

 

 80 – 180 ng/dL


CPT CODE

84480


INFORMATION

 

 Triiodothyronine (T3) is the hormone principally responsible for the effects thyroid hormone on the various target organs. T3 (3, 5, 3’– triiodothyronine) is mainly formed extra-thyroidally, particularly in the liver, by enzymatic 5’–deiodination of T4. Accordingly, the T3 concentration in serum is more a reflection of the functional state of the peripheral tissue than the secretory performance of the thyroid gland. A reduction in the conversion of T4 to T3 results in a fall in the Total T3 concentration. It occurs under the influence of medications such as propanolol, glucocorticoids or amiodarone and in severe non-thyroidal illness (NTI), and is referred to as the “low T3 syndrome”. As with T4, over 99% of T3 is bound to transport proteins, primarily TBG. However, the affinity of T3 to them is around 10-fold lower than for T4.  The determination of T3 is utilized in investigations of the etiology of hyperthyroidism.